May 23, 2019

my chat with Pat Sloan on her podcast


For years, I have listened to podcasts while I quilt. I love all kinds of quirky topics and especially love a bunch of the NPR podcasts, also history topics and of course sewing and quilting.

One of the best quilting ones is Pat Sloan's All People Quilt podcast. I enjoy hearing all the stories of quilters and have truly been listing for many many years....

And now, she invited me on as a guest! Wow. Such an honor and it was so fun to talk with her. Pat is as easy going and welcoming as you might guess she is from looking at her warm smiling photos.

We chatted about the content in all 3 of my books.... and Japanese quilts and cotton and American cotton farms and textiles and more quilts... it was just the best.




The podcast is now available through iTunes for download, or you can listen on your phone or computer at either of the following links.

Episode 421

https://blog.patsloan.com/2019/05/listen-to-pats-newest-podcast-for-may-20th.html  

or

http://www.allpeoplequilt.com/magazines-more/quilting-podcast


May 13, 2019

finished! "Cheddar, Charcoal and Cherry" - based on 1880s quilt

Teresa Duryea Wong. "Cheddar, Charcoal & Cherry." Cotton: 2019. Pieced and Applique. Machine quilted.
Based on a quilt originally made in 1890s (maker unknown) from the collection of Joanna S. Rose.
I finally finished this quilt! It is pieced and applique. All machine quilted... in fact almost every inch of this is covered in dense machine quilting.

I'm so happy with the way it turned out. There are some flaws... but aren't there always. The joy is in the making.


I was inspired to make this quilt after seeing the quilt below... originally made sometime around 1880-1900. It was part of an exhibition of cheddar quilts at the International Quilt Study Center & Museum in Lincoln, Nebraska. The original is part of the collection of Joanna S. Rose.

Maker Unknown. Made circa 1880-1900. Part of the exhibition "Cheddar Quilts" at the International
Quilt Study Center & Museum. From the collection of Joanna S. Rose.
The pattern is identified as a Rising Sun or Circle Saw. The original was probably made in the Southern U.S. More about the exhibition here.